Monday, May 12, 2008

Weekly Geeks: Childhood Favorites


This is a repost of a Sunday Salon post, but it seems appropriate for this week's Weekly Geeks theme (my first): fond memories of childhood books

At 2:
Raggedy Ann and Andy and nursery rhymes


"Children are made readers on the laps of their parents."
— Emilie Buchwald


"You may have tangible wealth untold.
Caskets of jewels and coffers of gold.
Richer than I you can never be –
I had a mother who read to me."
— Strickland Gillilan




At 12:
Nancy Drew, Laura Ingalls Wilder, Judy Blume, and the Happy Hollisters


She is too fond of books, and it has turned her brain. --Louisa May Alcott

A book reads the better which is our own, and has been so long known to us, that we know the topography of its blots, and dog's ears, and can trace the dirt in it to having read it at tea with buttered muffins. ~Charles Lamb, Last Essays of Elia, 1833

The stories of childhood leave an indelible impression, and their author always has a niche in the temple of memory from which the image is never cast out to be thrown on the rubbish heap of things that are outgrown and outlived. ~Howard Pyle




At 22:
Vietnam, Vonnegut, and Vast Volumes of Literature and History (AKA, my senior year of college)



A good book should leave you... slightly exhausted at the end. You live several lives while reading it. ~William Styron

A book must be an ice-axe to break the seas frozen inside our soul. ~Franz Kafka




At 32:
Motherhood and Graduate School



I would be most content if my children grew up to be the kind of people who think decorating consists mostly of building enough bookshelves. ~Anna Quindlen,

Far more seemly were it for thee to have thy study full of books, than thy purse full of money. ~John Lyly




At 42:
Books by Day for Them, Books by Night for Me



The love of learning, the sequestered nooks,
And all the sweet serenity of books.
~Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Good friends, good books and a sleepy conscience: this is the ideal life. ~Mark Twain



1 comment:

Jill said...

I identify with ages 12, 22, and 32. Thanks for reminding me of Laura Ingalls Wilder--I completely forgot about my fascination with her story!